Swimming

Cradle of Forestry

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Fontana Dam

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Fontana Dam and Visitor Center

Located in the far western corner of North Carolina, Fontana Dam is the tallest dam east of the Rockies at 480 feet. It was built by the Tennessee Valley Authority in response to an urgent need for electric power during World War II; construction began in 1942 and was finished in just 36 months.

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Gorges State Park

Plunging waterfalls, rugged river gorges, sheer rock walls and one of the greatest concentrations of rare and unique species in the eastern United States are found within Gorges State Park. An elevation that rises 2,000 feet in only four miles, combined with rainfall in excess of 80 inches per year, creates a temperate rain forest and supports a collection of waterfalls.

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Gorges State Park

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Lansing

Nestled in the High Country in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Western North Carolina is the charmingly rustic small town of Lansing, a prime travel destination in Ashe County.

From Villages and Trading Centers

Like numerous villages throughout Ashe County, Lansing began as a small trading center for the local agrarian population. It is not known where the name Lansing originated, but the name was used in the establishment of a post office on August 24, 1882. Lansing was one of the county's many modestly-sized rural communities in 1896.

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Lansing

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Brevard

The historic small town of Brevard is the county seat of Transylvania County, also known as "the land of the waterfalls." The community is surrounded by nature and the Pisgah National Forest.

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Highlands

The town of Highlands was supposed to become a hub of commerce in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, had its founders had their way.  In 1875, two developers in Kansas drew two lines--one between New York and New Orleans, the other from Chicago to Savannah.  Where the lines crossed, they believed would become a crossroads of trade. 

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Hot Springs

People have been visiting Hot Springs, a tiny village in the Blue Ridge Mountains, as a spa destination for more than 200 years. The Native Americans were the first to discover and use the warm mineral waters, followed by early traders and settlers in the latter years of the 18th century.

The Buncombe Turnpike brought more people through what was then known as Warm Springs, drovers herding thousands of cattle, hogs, horses, even turkeys, to Southern markets.  What a treat it must have been to stop in Hot Springs to "take the waters" on that long, dusty hike.

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