Tryon

A Small Town with Big Personalities

Many of the historic buildings on Tryon’s Trade Street, as we know it today, were in place by 1900, including a general store, pharmacy and post office.  Buildings like these have contributed to Tryon receiving the designation of historic district by the National Register of Historic Places. Tryon quickly grew as a resort town, bringing tourists to the area to enjoy the mountain views and good climate. Many artists, writers and crafters chose to stay – at least for a while – including the stage actor William Gillette, most famous for his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes, and F. Scott Fitzgerald.  This mix of locals, artists and retirees continues today, creating a vibrant, active community.

Equestrian Destination

The local equestrian community began with the help of Carter Brown, who organized the Tryon Riding and Hunt Club and the first Blockhouse Steeplechase in the 1940s.  Tryon’s local event calendar today is filled with equestrian events – including the spring running of the Steeplechase, and nearly year-round horse shows at the Foothills Equestrian Nature Center.

Tryon Toy Makers and the Tryon Horse

In 1915 Miss Eleanor Vance and Miss Charlotte Yale, co-founders of Biltmore Estate Industries, left Asheville, NC and resettled in Tryon where they purchased a cottage and soon were training young boys and girls to handcraft finely-designed and beautifully-crafted toys. Vance and Yale's little non-profit business, motivated by a desire to do good and to train young people in rewarding artist-work, eventually became the famous Tryon Toy Makers and Wood Carvers.

In 1928 two boys working for Tryon Toy Makers built a gigantic version of the popular little toy horse for a parade held in conjunction with the spring Tryon Horse Show, to advertise and celebrate Tryon Toy Makers. Their creation was so big that overhead wires along Trade Street had to be lifted out of the way in order for the Tryon Horse to participate in the procession. The toy makers also made miniature wheeled horse souvenirs to sell at the horse show. The giant horse was disassembled after the parade, stored in the basement at Hillcote, and brought out in subsequent years for the horse show parade. Eventually the Tryon Toy Makers donated it to the Tryon Riding and Hunt Club, eventually naming him "Morris" and creating a permanent position in the center of Tryon where he can be visited any time. See the photo on this page. Listen to this short Living Traditions Moments presentation about the Tryon Toy Makers.

Tryon Wine Country

In the late 1800s and early 1900s, Tryon was well known for its table and wine grapes. Due to prohibition, family businesses related to wine dried up over time. Beginning in the early 1990s, this interesting part of Tryon's history was revived--the planting of grapes for winemaking. About a dozen vineyards now lie about 10 miles to the east in the Tryon foothills. This area, with its gentle, rolling hills and clay-loam soils, has proven to be an excellent location for vinifera grapes. Five wineries welcome visitors for tasting, tours and beautiful mountain views.

Tryon Today

Visitors stroll down Trade Street and enjoy the shops and restaurants.  They may catch a movie at the tiny Tryon Theater or a performance at the Tryon Fine Arts Center. Scenic drives include a drive through the architecturally rich neighborhoods of Gillette Woods and Godshaw Hill; through the horse estates on Hunting Country Road; or along the Pacolet River Scenic Byway (Hwy 176).  Or picnic at Harmon Field and peruse the nearby antique stores. 

Annual Events

March: Super Saturday – Also known as the Children’s Theater Festival, this is a one-day festival of “lively arts” for children.  Eight to ten different performances encompassing theater, music, storytelling, mime, dance, puppetry and more are brought to Tryon on a Saturday in late March

May: Block House Steeple Chase – Horses and races, tailgate picnics and crazy hat contests, friendly people and a whole lot of fun!  Run by the Tryon Riding & Hunt Club.

June: Blue Ridge Barbecue Festival NC Championship

Festival features competition cookers, two music stages, the Foothills Craft Fair and children’s rides.  Admission includes parking.  Held the second Friday and Saturday in June each year.  Run by the Carolina Foothills Chamber of Commerce.

Summer – June through September

Summer Tracks at Rogers Park – Named for the RR tracks running through the park, enjoy this series of FREE Friday night summer concerts.  Schedule available at the Tryon Visitors Center, Polk County Travel & Tourism Office, and online.  

November: Tryon Beer Fest – TAP INTO TRYON

Typically held in early November, the Annual Tryon Beer Fest runs from noon until 6pm in the Tryon Depot Plaza. Tickets are sold in advance (online and at local retailers) and at the gate (cash only). Festival only (“Designated Driver”) tickets are also available at the gate (cash only).Admission includes unlimited beer and wine samples.

 An array of craft beers are available, along with an oyster roast, authentic German food, non-alcoholic beverages and water. Live Bavarian music entertains during the day, followed by a live rock band later in the afternoon. This is a rain or shine event, under the sun or under a heated tent, depending on the weather.

December: Tryon Christmas Stroll

Tryon Downtown Development Association members serve refreshments at their businesses.  Santa listens to children’s wish lists.  Carolers make joyful noises.  Friday night early in December – Small town Christmas at its charming best! 

301 N Trade Street
Tryon, NC 28782
828-859-6484
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Also Nearby

Tryon Arts and Crafts School (1 mile)

Tryon Arts and Crafts School (TACS), in Tryon, NC, is a regional center for arts and crafts in the Appalachian Foothills.

Polk County History Museum (4 miles)

See this fine collection of historic artifacts that tell the story of Polk County.

House of Flags Museum (4 miles)

Every flag has a story to tell.